Egregious Thought-Holes

Mind the Gaps

2 notes

So I have a representation problem and need some help.

So I’m working on a writing project (shut UP, Dino) in which one of the protagonists in a Native American person - more specifically, a member of the Sioux tribe. This character exists in a futuristic setting (Shadowrun, if anyone is familiar with the universe) and goes to school in Philadelphia, very much away from his place of birth and native community. Because of the genre of the piece I am working on, this protagonist becomes part of a group of criminals (shadowrunners), following roughly in the steps of his father.

Now, being Russian, I know how frustrating it is when someone screws up my culture in American media, even if it’s something as small as saying something that I know is very unlikely to come out of a Russian person’s mouth. Now, I find myself writing a character who has a complicated relationship with his own culture, about which I myself know next to nothing.

To complicate matter further, in this setting, many characters are magicians, and a discipline of magic common to Native Americans in this setting is Shamanism. Needless to say, I could mess this up really, really badly, and that is something I would strongly prefer to avoid.

So what I’m asking is, are there any good books or films anyone knows that represent Native American culture in a way that truly meshes with the experiences of actual people from that culture? Basically, if anyone reading this is Native American: are there any books or movies in the English language (or Russian language, for that matter), that you feel represent your life experiences without making you cringe?

Thank you very much in advance, this would be a huge help.

Filed under Native American Culture Sioux shadowrun representation

1,719 notes

me:
*looks over field* we only get 6, 7 notes most of the time
me:
*single tear* but we're honest prairie bloggers, same as anyone else

1,264 notes

“I don’t have money,” Mason said, “to pay for other people’s health insurance.”

That may be the most insightful statement of the misguided conservative philosophy of self-interest I have ever heard. Senator, you already pay for other people’s health insurance. And assuming you have health insurance, other people pay for yours. That’s the way insurance works.

Very few people can afford to pay out of pocket for health care, so we pool our resources. No one pays in as much as they collect if and when they become seriously ill. We all underwrite one another. That’s why we need young, healthy people in the pool and why there is a health care mandate. And if people do not have health insurance, we pay for their care in the increased cost of our own health care and hospitalization.

The same is true of life insurance. Sure, you pay premiums, but when you cash out, it’s other people’s money that pays the death benefit. No one pays their own way in this world.

I first became aware of the emboldened and benighted selfishness of the conservative right when I served on the local School Committee back in the 1990s and heard people arguing that they should not have to pay for other people’s kids to go to school. Somehow the idea that you shouldn’t have to pay for anything that doesn’t directly benefit you swept through the conservative movement like a self-inflicted virus.

A decade on, I find it extremely tiresome to hear conservatives constantly complain about paying for health care, unemployment benefits and food stamps as though they were footing the entire bill themselves. They would have you believe that they not only pay their own way, but also have to support an entire family of illegal immigrants on welfare.

To begin with, no one pays their own way. We are all supported by other people’s money. And when it comes to taxes, the portion that goes to assist the poor is a pittance.

The American way of life is underwritten by the tax dollars we pool to support a civil society and the money we pay into a social safety network of Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and military and public pensions. No one other than criminals would be able to make a living, were it not for our concerted effort to work for the common good.

Of course, conservatives don’t believe in the common good, which to me means they don’t believe in America. Only in the perverse logic of the right, for example, could a Nevada rancher who refuses to pay the same fees as other ranchers for grazing his cattle on public land be considered some kind of a folk hero. He’s a thief.

The Universal Notebook: Other people’s money | The Forecaster (via other-stuff)

(via logic-and-art)

168 notes

Anonymous asked: those two aren't companions the doctor doesn't like soldiers he wouldn't have soldiers as companions who are those two one off characters they don't count

leda74:

vicomteraoulchagny:

ooooh shit you have said this to the wrong person

*Clearing throat*

Sergeant John Benton and Captain Mike Yates were the Third Doctor’s companions and part of UNIT they were in the show from around Season 7 to 11 and Benton is in episodes in season 12 and 13 (also he was in season 6 and met the second Doctor, He was in The Three Doctors as well). Mike makes an “appearance” in The Five Doctors and is in Dimensions in Time. Ok so if you are going to say they are not companions well what the hell is this then imageThe what chronicles? the COMPANION CHRONICLES

now if you do not agree with me on this please go away i do not have time for people who do not love the UNIT boys.

Dear Anonymous: Even if you don’t think Benton and Yates count, Steven Taylor certainly does. And Steven was a soldier. He was a captured POW on Mechanus when he first encountered the Doctor and company.

Not to mention the Brigadier. He may not have traveled with the Doctor, but the two were best friends - largely through prolonged exposure.

As for Ian being a soldier - I believe that was a detail invented for the novels (some quick research over here tells me that the details of his military service come from the BBC Past Doctor Adventures line: http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/Ian_Chesterton )

Plus, there was a little thing in the UK known as conscription, so…

Now on the one hand, Ian’s past as a soldier might not enter your mind when you think about his defining qualities. However, if you  watch the serials (especially The Aztecs), you realize that he’s an extremely capable fighter, which lines up with his military past quite well. Of course, back then, the Doctor was “just starting out” (read: accidentally kidnapped two people), so his hypocritical standards had yet to set in.

Filed under Doctor Who Soldiers Ian Chesterton Into the Dalek Benton Yates

998 notes

zagreus-taking-time-apart:

if doctors 1-8 were off on their light at the end adventure and war doctor, 10, and 11 were doing the whole day of the doctor thing I’m just going to assume shalka doctor and 9 grabbed a milkshake together and spent the whole day avoiding all this weird shit

145,951 notes

geekygothgirl:

coolandfroody:

dustedsunshine:

campdracula5eva:

girlinfourcolors:

atomstargazer:

Teen creates bio-plastic from banana peels

Sixteen-year-old Elif Bilgin of Turkey has developed a way to replace traditional petroleum-based plastic with banana peels.
The Turkish teen took home a US$50,000 prize for her project “Go Bananas!” Thursday after winning the second annual Scientific American Science in Action Award, associated with Google Science Fair.
“My project makes it possible to use banana peels, a waste material which is thrown away almost every day, in the electrical insulation of cables,” Bilgin said in a media statement.
“This is both an extremely nature-friendly and cheap process, which has the potential to decrease the amount of pollution created due to the use of plastics, which contain petroleum derivatives.”
Bilgin spent two years developing the bio-plastic, which does not decay. She said the process is so easy that it is possible to repeat at home, with special care taken for chemicals used in the production process.
In September, the teen will compete at Google’s California headquarters for the overall Google Science Fair prize for 15-to-16 year olds. She will also have access to a one-year mentorship.


Has anyone else noticed how many brilliant breakthroughs in science are coming from the minds of teenage girls the last few years? Between this story, the four girls in Nigeria who invented a generator that runs on urine, the California girl who invented a twenty-second cell phone charger… Who knows where we’d be today without the patriarchal interference of men, stealing or hiding the brilliance of women?
Our future is in the hands of teenage girls, and I for one feel really good about that.

When I was about 7 I wanted to invent a thing that purified water based off of fish gills. I went to the school library to do research like a good little inventor and one of my teachers asked me what I was doing, and then told me that there were some new barbie books in, and that I’d probably be better off with those.

Don’t forget the girl who invented a torch that’d light up just from the heat of your hands
basically everyone should stop s***ting on teenage girls because they do awesome things when you let them

or that one time a girl found the cure for cancer that we could be using in 15 years

But nah, girls and women just suck at math and science and have never invented anything worthwhile. Sure. Right. 

geekygothgirl:

coolandfroody:

dustedsunshine:

campdracula5eva:

girlinfourcolors:

atomstargazer:

Teen creates bio-plastic from banana peels

Sixteen-year-old Elif Bilgin of Turkey has developed a way to replace traditional petroleum-based plastic with banana peels.

The Turkish teen took home a US$50,000 prize for her project “Go Bananas!” Thursday after winning the second annual Scientific American Science in Action Award, associated with Google Science Fair.

“My project makes it possible to use banana peels, a waste material which is thrown away almost every day, in the electrical insulation of cables,” Bilgin said in a media statement.

“This is both an extremely nature-friendly and cheap process, which has the potential to decrease the amount of pollution created due to the use of plastics, which contain petroleum derivatives.”

Bilgin spent two years developing the bio-plastic, which does not decay. She said the process is so easy that it is possible to repeat at home, with special care taken for chemicals used in the production process.

In September, the teen will compete at Google’s California headquarters for the overall Google Science Fair prize for 15-to-16 year olds. She will also have access to a one-year mentorship.

Has anyone else noticed how many brilliant breakthroughs in science are coming from the minds of teenage girls the last few years? Between this story, the four girls in Nigeria who invented a generator that runs on urine, the California girl who invented a twenty-second cell phone charger… Who knows where we’d be today without the patriarchal interference of men, stealing or hiding the brilliance of women?

Our future is in the hands of teenage girls, and I for one feel really good about that.

When I was about 7 I wanted to invent a thing that purified water based off of fish gills. I went to the school library to do research like a good little inventor and one of my teachers asked me what I was doing, and then told me that there were some new barbie books in, and that I’d probably be better off with those.

Don’t forget the girl who invented a torch that’d light up just from the heat of your hands

basically everyone should stop s***ting on teenage girls because they do awesome things when you let them

or that one time a girl found the cure for cancer that we could be using in 15 years

But nah, girls and women just suck at math and science and have never invented anything worthwhile. Sure. Right. 

(Source: thinkcosmos, via withasideofepic)

195 notes

doctorwho247:

Russell T Davies has said Paul McGann’s Doctor being ‘half-human’ shouldn’t be ignored.

In a scene in the 1996 Doctor Who TV Movie, Paul McGann’s Doctor says he is half-human “On his mother’s side,” though this appears to have been ignored by fans ever since.

However, speaking on a Big Finsh Podcast, Russell T Davies said: “I don’t like the half-human thing. He certainly isn’t half-human, but it’s less interesting to say it simply doesn’t count.”

He added: “I always wanted to put in a line where someone says to the Doctor ‘Are you human?’ and the Doctor says ‘No’, but I was once in 1999. It was a 24 hour bunk. Part of the reason I never put that in was it was a bit too self-referential but also I thought I’m spoiling the TV Movie if I do that.”

“In that time, like it or not, the Doctor was half human. Everything in that story says he was half human, so you can’t not count it. I don’t think we can ignore it.”

doctorwho247:

Russell T Davies has said Paul McGann’s Doctor being ‘half-human’ shouldn’t be ignored.

In a scene in the 1996 Doctor Who TV Movie, Paul McGann’s Doctor says he is half-human “On his mother’s side,” though this appears to have been ignored by fans ever since.

However, speaking on a Big Finsh Podcast, Russell T Davies said: “I don’t like the half-human thing. He certainly isn’t half-human, but it’s less interesting to say it simply doesn’t count.”

He added: “I always wanted to put in a line where someone says to the Doctor ‘Are you human?’ and the Doctor says ‘No’, but I was once in 1999. It was a 24 hour bunk. Part of the reason I never put that in was it was a bit too self-referential but also I thought I’m spoiling the TV Movie if I do that.”

“In that time, like it or not, the Doctor was half human. Everything in that story says he was half human, so you can’t not count it. I don’t think we can ignore it.”